Cottonwood Heights to host open space open house

Open spaces are valuable assets and integral to the quality of life that the residents of Cottonwood Heights enjoy. Parks, natural trails, the foothills and other open spaces are central to the community’s identity.

The Cottonwood Heights Community and Economic Development Department (CHED) will host an open Space Open House on Thursday, Sept. 28 from 5-7 p.m. at Cottonwood Heights City Hall (2277 E. Bengal Blvd.) to get feedback and suggestions from the community.

Everyone is invited to attend the open house to help city officials create an Open Space Master Plan that reflects the community’s vision for the future of open space in the city.

“The master plan will be a visionary approach to guiding open space planning in the community and into the future,” says CHED Director Brian Berndt. “The plan is a city initiative that will provide the city decision makers with guidance to develop an interconnected system of passive and active open spaces and natural trails for the benefit of residents and visitors alike.”

Among other things, the Open Space Master Plan will:

·          Create a vision statement to guide the open space planning process

·          Establish a public participation program suited to the outcome of the plan

·          Create a plan for management and possible acquisition of open space

·          Preserve open space and natural trail corridors for future generations

·          Enhance safe connections between open space, natural trails and the built environment

For more information, contact Brian Berndt at 801-944-7066 or bberndt@ch.utah.gov.

MasterControl moves into new headquarters

MasterControl Inc., a Utah-based provider of enterprise software solutions for the life science industry, has moved into its new corporate headquarters in Cottonwood Heights. The completely renovated six-floor, 154,000-square-foot office building is located in the Old Mill Corporate Center.

Although 300 MasterControl employees will work in the new building initially, company officials said the new offices were chosen with longevity in mind. MasterControl foresees future growth that will double its workforce in Utah to more than 600 in the coming years.

“We are proud to be a Utah-based company and when choosing a new office space to accommodate our growth, we wanted a location that offers the best of Utah,” said Jon Beckstrand, CEO of MasterControl. “The Old Mill Corporate Center is a premier business facility close to downtown Salt Lake, but just minutes away from some of the finest ski resorts and outdoor recreation activities in the nation. This location and building will provide an environment that is conducive to innovation, but has the nearby amenities to also enable a happy work-life balance, which is an important part of our company culture.”

Applications Being Accepted for the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program

 
The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program at Salt Lake Community College is accepting applications.
 
This program is for small businesses that links learning to action. Participants will gain practical skills in negotiation, marketing, and employee management. They will receive the tools and professional support they need to develop a strategic business growth plan to take their company to the next level. Across the U.S., 10,000 Small Businesses graduates are increasing their revenues and creating new jobs in their communities:
 
69% Reported increasing revenues just 6 mo. after graduating.
 
48% Reported creating new jobs just six months after graduating.
 
85% Are doing business with each other.
 
99% Completed the program.
 

The Cottonwood Heights Landscaping/Beautification Award Program

The new Cottonwood Heights Landscaping/Beautification Award Program recognizes well-maintained and beautiful landscapes in our community.

The city invites all residential homeowners and commercial businesses to enter and participate in this program. Nominations may be for your own landscape or a neighbor’s.

Landscapes are judged by the Cottonwood Heights City Council, with a winner selected from each district and a Mayor’s Award presented to a commercial property located anywhere in the city.

Entries are due by Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, and winners will be announced in September. For more information, stop in at City Hall (2277 E. Bengal Blvd.), or download a form here.

Is Utah, the Next Silicon Valley?

Utah, the Next Silicon Valley?

By John Rampton

Editor’s Note: In the new podcast Masters of Scale, LinkedIn co-founder and Greylock partner Reid Hoffman explores his philosophy on how to scale a business — and at Entrepreneur.com, entrepreneurs are responding with their own ideas and experiences on our hub. This week, we’re discussing Hoffman’s theory: Silicon Valley has an inimitable blend of talent. No other region can match its collective capacity or wisdom for scaling, except maybe China. Listen to this week’s episode here

The many years living and working in Silicon Valley have shown me how an established community can be very favorable both personally and also for a business. The value this Valley has had for me cannot even be underestimated. I was able to instantly tap into the ecosystem here and start building different businesses. This great Valley continues to provide me with connections, inspiration and opportunities I crave.

However, so much of the talent I incorporate along with contacts for investments, strategic opportunities and expansion comes from all parts of the world.

My first reaction to a question about the world becoming all virtual, was to picture the world in a total virtual reality (VR) of itself. I even said that the virtual environment would quickly become the next Silicon Valley. I think eventually the internet of things (IoT) and the development of other technology will create a virtual startup ecosystem.

Until that time comes, I’m partial to Utah as the next Silicon Valley. This is not just because I grew up there. It’s the fact that every time I return to Utah, I see the incredible growth in startups, investors and tech talent.

Now, other people are picking up on this knowledge and witnessing what I’ve seen. My thoughts won’t be held so privately anymore. The clues show that factors in Utah are ones that can turn any area into the next Silicon Valley:

A business mindset

An area has to be focused on the idea of innovation and entrepreneurial growth. There can be a group of entrepreneurs who are passionate, but it will take the actions of a local city and government to bring about the possibilities.

Organizations have to understand the intricacies of what businesses require in order for them to come to your state. Large businesses have to be lured into a city or state with the right motivation. They have to be able to see, with fair certainty, that scaling growth is not only possible but likely to occur. Great entrepreneurial opportunity and positive business expansion won’t become a reality without the cooperation, encouragement and especially the planning of local government.

This means creating programs and stimulating the local environment for businesses to start up easily. This means minimal paperwork and bureaucracy, the correct financial incentives and amenable lending programs.

I’ve seen areas have lightbulb moments in Utah. Places where state and city governments are heavily involved in developing the programs, framework and infrastructure necessary so entrepreneurs can make these incredible businesses there. Utah is a place where a business can get started without being put off by the legal requirements that typically shut down small business startups elsewhere.

If these cities and the state had been that welcoming to business when I got started, I most likely would have stayed in Utah. I went where the ecosystem allowed me to ramp up quickly. Now, I see that the local Utah government has finally learned and understood what really is at stake in its decisions. Startup organizations now see the connection between helping entrepreneurs and businesses, and the enjoyment of an uplift in their economy.

Multiple-sector orientation

Research has shown that those areas that are focused on one industry or business sector are less open to the idea of what a Silicon Valley ecosystem offers.

In contrast, areas like Utah that are known to be open to multiple industries throughout the region that are ripe for a technological environment. Utah has become known for everything from software and medical devices to aerospace. Since technology is now permeating all types of industries, this makes it an ideal location to test and develop disruptive solutions in multiple areas.

An area of any country that would just have only one industry won’t offer the same opportunities or understanding that businesses require. Every time I return to Utah, there are other niche businesses that are launching, which makes for an exciting and stimulating environment for everyone. The elation and the motivation start to spread, and the people gain a hopeful passion that they can create something of value.

Social consciousness and equality

With so many startups focused on making the world a better place and solving issues that impact humanity, Utah is the perfect place to build that social consciousness. The state was built on a values system that has always emphasized family and an acknowledgment of a greater good that we can all appreciate. It’s an ecosystem that is growing based on a kinder, people-focused business environment. Maybe Utah could even raise the bar for Silicon Valley, which has always been known for it’s generous, intuitive altruism.

It has been shown that there needs to be greater equality infused into Silicon Valley. This attribution is already found in Utah. Female entrepreneurs are growing at a faster rate than elsewhere in the country. They are potentially building what could become a unique startup ecosystem within itself.

According to information from a Salt Lake Tribune article, “The state ranks as the best state in the country for business by CNBC, 24/7 Wall Street and Forbes.” Additionally, the 2016 State of Women-Owned Small Businesses Report commissioned by American Express OPEN,ranks Utah in the top 10 states for growth in the number and economic clout of women-owned businesses. The article states, “It’s estimated in Utah that 83,800 women-owned businesses employ 75,400 people and generate sales of $14 billion — a growth of 38.8 percent since 2007.”

Even if you don’t personally think the state will become the next Silicon Valley, these types of statistics point out that Utah could potentially become its own socially conscious, equal opportunity startup ecosystem.

Entrepreneur events

From high school and university contests to more networking events throughout the state, Utah understands that building a startup ecosystem means encouraging younger generations to think like entrepreneurs.

I wish they had had entrepreneurial classes and events in local high schools when I attended them, but I still found my way into entrepreneurship. I’m hoping the road is made easier for the “new” entrepreneur now.

These classes and contests are helping students see that there is more to work and life beyond the traditional employment route. Showing these students what’s truly possible can get them to think differently than typical graduates. It’s teaching the entrepreneurial way of thinking and acting that will help them innovate at a faster rate.

In the combination of growing up with technology and potentially even having parents that telecommute or work in a flex arrangement, these future generations of burgeoning entrepreneurs can turn the state into a Silicon Valley ecosystem. The ecosystem will be able to sustain itself through an ongoing stream of graduating entrepreneurs.

This means that the state can generate graduates geared toward this specific career path. These natural entrepreneurs can learn how to build out the ecosystem from the high school classrooms — something that Silicon Valley did not necessarily do in the past. None of us knew how to run a program like that back then.

Silicon Valley is leading out and discovering new processes for high school students at this time and will lead out once again in this area of teaching and learning. But now, the rest of the world is watching Silicon Valley and can cultivate their own entrepreneurial mindset immediately in their own communities.

More ingredients

These are just some of the ingredients that were innate in the Silicon Valley ecosystem.

However, I can see that these elements and factors have been incorporated into the Utah systems.

These additives can now turn Utah into an entrepreneurial hotbed. Even better is that those within the state are putting their own spin on what this ecosystem looks like. This is driving appealing improvements on the original idea from which other areas will be able to capitalize and learn.

I’m excited to have one foot in that ecosystem and one in Silicon Valley because I can enjoy the benefits of both.

 

John Rampton is an entrepreneur, investor, online marketing guru and startup enthusiast. He is founder of the online invoicing company Due. John is best known as an entrepreneur and connector. He was recently named #3 on Top 50 Online Influencers in the World by Entrepreneur Magazine and has been one of the Top 10 Most Influential PPC Experts in the World for the past three years. He currently advises several companies in the San Francisco Bay area.

Best Place for Business and Careers/Healthy City

Utah continues to get noticed for its great business environment. Two cities in the state made the Top Ten on the Forbes Best Places for Business and Careers list!

Check it out!

Salt Lake was also listed as the second healthiest city in the country by WalletHub. Using data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Census Bureau, cities were evaluated across numerous metrics, such as health care, fitness and access to green space.

Read more

 

Business Boot Camp: Content Marketing

What is Content Marketing?

FREE Workshop to Help Today’s Entrepreneurs

 May 12, 2017. Cottonwood Heights, UT. Why should your company implement content marketing as opposed to traditional marketing techniques? This free workshop will help you discover how to create engaging content that is relevant, timely and focused on connecting with your audience.

“As traditional marketing becomes less effective, businesses need to adapt their messages and how those messages are delivered,” says Peri Kinder, Cottonwood Heights Business Development Coordinator. “Learning how to utilize content marketing could be a game-changer for your business.”

The FREE event will be held at Cottonwood Heights City Hall Community Room (2277 E. Bengal Blvd.) on Thursday, May 18 from 5:30-7:00 p.m. Seating is limited so contact pkinder@ch.utah.gov to reserve a seat.

Cottonwood Heights Economic Development Department Wins Best of State

Cottonwood Heights Economic Development Department Wins Best of State

City recognized for business-friendly programs

April 26, 2017. Cottonwood Heights, UT. The City of Cottonwood Heights and its Economic and Business Development Program is changing the way cities engage with businesses and business owners. Its efforts have paid off as the city was announced the winner of the 2017 Best of State Award for Economic Development Management in the Public Sector.

The award recognizes the city’s endeavors to streamline processes, explore a variety of business engagement options, create educational opportunities for business owners, and build an environment of collaboration and connection with businesses that is beneficial to the current and future growth in the city. 

“It was our goal to create a business-friendly organization for everything from land-use applications and building permits to inspections and business licensing,” said Brian Berndt, Cottonwood Heights Community and Economic Development Director. “The department went through all its processes, looking for ways to improve service.  As the organization continues to grow, new ideas and new ways to engage business owners are offered in a wide range of activities.”

Part of the business program includes the organization of the Cottonwood Heights Business Association (CHBA), in lieu of a Chamber of Commerce. Every business in the city is an automatic member of the CHBA, which charges no fees for membership and offers low- or no-cost luncheons, business workshops, expos and networking opportunities.

In September 2016, Cottonwood Heights was recognized as a Business Friendly Community as part of the Governor’s Utah Business Friendly Cities Initiative.

Cynthia L. McHenry is the new VP of Operations at Dynatronics

Cyndi’s appointment concludes an extensive search process conducted by the company as it continues to execute on its strategic plans and initiatives. Her hiring will facilitate a more aggressive approach to our expansion plans through acquisitions and better focus on improving operating efficiencies.

For close to 20 years, Cyndi worked for St. Jude Medical (now Abbott), an industry leader providing artificial heart valves, pacemakers, and other disease-management medical devices. Cyndi worked as their Senior Director of Global Operations Integration and Site Optimization from 2013 – 2015, where she defined strategy and led business integrations and site consolidations in the US and internationally.  Before this position, she served as the Director of Product Development (2008-2013) and Director of Engineering Operations and Services (2002-2008).

“Cyndi’s experience in manufacturing, distribution, purchasing and integration brings significant depth to the Dynatronics’ management team,” said Kelvyn H. Cullimore, Jr., Dynatronics’ Chairman and CEO.  “Given Cyndi’s extensive background across all areas of production and change management, as well as her experience at St. Jude Medical for nearly 20 years, I am confident in her ability to lead our operations.  I believe she will be a strong leader in all aspects of our manufacturing, distribution and purchasing.  I look forward to the ideas and perspectives she will bring to Dynatronics.”

In her role at Dynatronics, Cyndi will serve on the company’s executive management team and will also play a key role in the planning and integration of acquisitions.  Her predecessor in the role, Doug Sampson has been appointed Vice President of Research, Development and Quality Systems for Dynatronics, focused on accelerating the development of new products and driving Dynatronics’ commitment to quality and compliance.

“I am very pleased to join Dynatronics,” said Ms. McHenry.  “This is a company with a great reputation and momentum in the physical medicine industry. I am excited to join the management team and to contribute to the success of the business as we continue to evolve into a profitable and growing company.”

Dynatronics manufactures, markets and distributes advanced-technology medical devices, orthopedic soft goods and supplies, treatment tables and rehabilitation equipment for the physical therapy, sports medicine, chiropractic, podiatry and related markets.

Written by PR Newswire